Talkpalsforum
Home of Entertainment and Lifestyle for Everybody 💯💜
Our website was down for some days please if you lose your membership kindly Register thanks so muchCREATE NEW TOPIC-- HERE

What you must know about Hepatitis and how you can protect yourself

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Graceman

 





Hepatitis refers to an inflammatory condition of the liver. It's commonly caused by a viral infection, but there are other possible causes of hepatitis. These include autoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis that occurs as a secondary result of medications, drugs, toxins, and alcohol.

Viral hepatitis is an infection that causes liver inflammation and damage. Inflammation is swelling that occurs when tissues of the body become injured or infected. Inflammation can damage organs. ... The hepatitis A and E viruses typically cause only acute, or short-term, infections.

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. The liver is a vital organ that processes nutrients, filters the blood, and fights infections. When the liver is inflamed or damaged, its function can be affected. Heavy alcohol use, toxins, some medications, and certain medical conditions can cause hepatitis.

In the United States, viral hepatitis is most commonly caused by hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). These three viruses can all result in acute disease with symptoms of nausea, abdominal pain, fatigue, malaise, and jaundice.

 



What Are the Symptoms? Some people who have some form of hepatitis feel like they have the flu -- weak, tired, and sick to their stomach. Many people have mild or no symptoms at all, which is why hepatitis is sometimes called a “silent” disease. Other people have yellow skin or dark-colored urine.

Some people may develop hepatitis C symptoms within two weeks of infection. Others might experience a longer delay before noticing symptoms. It could take from 6 months to 10 years or more before someone with the virus becomes aware of any symptoms.

Although those with chronic hepatitis B infection live with an increased risk of developing liver disease later in life, many should expect to live long and healthy lives. Someone with chronic hepatitis B should be seen by a liver specialist every six months, or more often as needed.

People usually get hepatitis A by having close contact with a person who is infected, from food or drinks prepared by someone who is infected, or by eating shellfish harvested from sewage-contaminated water. After the virus enters the body, there is an incubation period lasting 2 to 7 weeks until illness begins.

Hepatitis B is a serious infection of the liver caused by a virus. ... The virus is found in blood, semen, vaginal fluids and saliva. Hepatitis B is the only STD that has a safe and effective vaccine to protect against infection.


Hepatitis B infection is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The virus is passed from person to person through blood, semen or other body fluids. It does not spread by sneezing or coughing.

The most important thing to remember is that hepatitis B is a chronic medical condition (such as diabetes and high blood pressure) that can be successfully managed if you take good care of your health and your liver. You should expect to live a long, full life.

Anyone who lives with or is close to someone who has been diagnosed with chronic Hepatitis B should get tested. Hepatitis B can be a serious illness, and the virus can be spread from an infected person to other family and household members, caregivers.

The virus can't be transmitted through casual contact, such as sharing a cup or eating utensils with an infected person. Hugging, holding hands, and kissing also won't spread it. You can't catch the virus from someone with hepatitis C sneezing or coughing on you.

Most experts believe that the risk of sexual transmission of HCV is low. Most studies show that only a small percentage of people – usually ranging from 0-3% – contract HCV through unprotected heterosexual intercourse with a long-term, monogamous HCV-positive partner.


Many people live with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) without even knowing they have it. Hepatitis C, caused by HCV, damages the liver. About 15 to 25 percent of people with the virus clear it without treatment. This is called acute HCV and is rarely associated with life-threatening conditions.

Your doctor may order a viral serology panel, a group of blood tests that determines whether you have hepatitis, which strain it is, and the severity of your illness. A sample of blood is taken from the arm or hand and used to do a screening test for all types of the virus.

Although those with chronic hepatitis B infection live with an increased risk of developing liver disease later in life, many should expect to live long and healthy lives. Someone with chronic hepatitis B should be seen by a liver specialist every six months, or more often as needed.

Hepatitis B is a liver infection caused by a virus (called the hepatitis B virus, or HBV). It can be serious and there's no cure, but the good news is it's easy to prevent. You can protect yourself by getting the hepatitis B vaccine and having safer s*x.

Hepatitis C is the most common blood borne virus in the USA. It is considered to be the most serious of the hepatitis viruses. Once exposed, the majority of people (60-85%) go on to develop chronic hepatitis C

The study showed that in the two and a half decades after 1984, hepatitis B infection was more serious than hepatitis C. Now, in 2012, this difference is even greater. Chronic hepatitis C has become a curable disease. Chronic hepatitis B is manageable, but not yet curable.S

Hepatitis A (Hep A) is liver inflammation caused by the hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A is very contagious. This means that you can easily catch the virus from someone or give it to another person.


There is no cure for hepatitis A, but treatment can help manage symptoms. Avoiding alcohol can help with recovery, but most people recover without intervention. Learn more about hepatitis A here.

One of the most common questions we receive is: If I have hepatitis B, can I still get married? To put it simply, yes, a person living with hepatitis B can get married. In fact, a healthy relationship can be a source of love and support for those who may feel alone in their diagnosis.


###newslive247


We rise by giving


 

SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2020, SimplePortal